Afghan Heroes

In the first phase of our mission we seek to deliver: Front Line Support: To support all our service personnel operating in theatre in Afghanistan. To provide the much needed “home comfort“ supplies and gifts to those service personnel. To promote and embrace a new initiative “Thank The Troops” to ensure our soldiers know they are not alone. On the home-front: Support groups for the families of the fallen. Regional network groups. Charity events so they can come together.   In each of all of these tasks, we aim to work with the military authorities to ensure the right support reaches the right people at the right time. The second phase of our mission is to help those who have returned from Afghanistan to overcome difficulties by: Support for the Returning Troops: With the intention of providing emotional, psychological help through support groups for all returning soldiers and families of the fallen. Help with vocational training, including: IT equipment, computers and printers. Assisting other minor charities in their work. Creating a lasting legacy in support of our operations in Afghanistan.
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Help for heroes

Who are H4H? H4H was founded by Bryn and Emma Parry after a visit to the hospital at Selly Oak. It is a charity (Reg no 1120920) which provides direct, practical support, primarily to those wounded in current conflicts. It launched on 1 Oct 2007. Why was H4H formed? We don’t care about the rights and wrongs of war but we believe that if young men and women are prepared to volunteer to serve our country on our behalf, and are hurt while doing so, they deserve our support. We want that support to be the best and to be there for life. What does H4H do? We raise funds and give grants to; Build capital projects like the £8.5m Rehabilitation Complex at Headley Court, the H4H wing at Combat Stress, the £1 million enhancement of facilities at Blind Veterans UK, Llandudno or the Recovery Centres at Tidworth , Catterick , Colchester and Plymouth. Help individuals. Where there is need, we provide immediate support to serving, veterans and their families through our Quick Reaction and our Individual Recovery Programme funds. As at August 2012, Help for Heroes has awarded £4.2m to these funds, helping 2,226 individuals. Support Battle Back. We
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Troop aid

What we are doing When injured troops return to the United Kingdom from the war zones they arrive back without their personal effects or clothing.  The objective of TROOP AID is to supply the ‘basic essentials’ when service casualties return from serving their country overseas. Our GRAB BAGS are currently being sent to the Field Hospital in Afghanistan, Cyprus and the Falkland Islands, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham plus the Ministry of Defence Hospital Units in Plymouth, Portsmouth and Frimley Park Hospital in Camberley. Who we are TROOP AID was founded in November 2006 by three ex servicemen as a result of a visit to Selly Oak Hospital’s Alexandra Wing in Birmingham.  This is the home of the Defence Medical Welfare Services who are responsible for the welfare of all Armed Forces Personnel, male and female who have been injured during the conflict in Afghanistan and elsewhere.
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The Soldiers’ Charity

Why does The Soldiers’ Charity exist? We are The Soldiers’ Charity. We give lifetime support to serving and retired soldiers and their families. They risk so much for us, but for them, it’s just doing their job.In return, we provide financial assistance when they are in real need. That’s what we’ve been here to offer for 68 years.We have seen a 30% rise over the past two years in applications from soldiers who have taken part in previous and current conflicts and we currently raise £7 million a year to meet this need.As a result of Current Operations it is anticipated that the requests for assistance will rise significantly in the coming years. It is the aim of The Soldiers’ Charity to increase fundraising to £14 million a year by 2015 to be sure that we can help each and every soldier that needs our help.We depend entirely on your donations and goodwill to do this. Our background We are very proud of our rich history and are determined to make the most of theopportunities ahead of us, building on the last 68 years of success and support.The Soldiers’ Charity began as the Army Benevolent Fund in 1944. Today, the
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Royal marines

Helping the wounded and injured in any way we can, particularly as the most severely injured begin their transition into civilian life; quite simply, the RMCTF will help when others cannot.Helping those still serving and facing successive tours in high threat environments – providing adventure training for those returning from operations, funding homecoming events, financing memorials, maintaining our heritage etc. The endowment of Royal Marines charities has grown over the years by means of a limited amount of fund raising but mainly from bequests, most of which were made for quite specific and restrictive purposes.  Over time this made the structure unwieldy and inflexible so, with the support of the Charity Commission, the Trustees have been through a process of rationalisation which culminated on 1 April 2010 with the formation of the Royal Marines Charitable Trust Fund as the overarching Royal Marines charity. The Royal Marines Charitable Trust Fund also has its own identity as the most general of our funds and the one with the most flexible purposes.  By giving to the Royal Marines Charitable Trust Fund, donors are empowering the Trustees to use the money given wisely, to meet any of the purposes of the wider charity and, crucially, at
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Erskine

Erskine has been looking after our veterans for almost 100 years and is the leading care organisation for ex-Service men and women in Scotland. Caring for our hero sons The devastation of the First World War highlighted the fact that there were insufficient hospital facilities to care for those who were wounded in battle. Thanks to the generosity of the people of Scotland, the first Erskine Hospital, then The Princess Louise Scottish Hospital for Limbless Sailors and Soldiers, was opened in October 1916. Of the many thousands of British veterans who were disabled in battle, one in five was treated at Erskine. Help for amputees The desperate shortage of artificial limbs for amputees returning from the war was resolved by the hospital’s first great surgeon, Sir William Macewen. Recruiting skilled workers from the nearby Clydeside shipyards, the Erskine limb was soon devised and over 600 fitted. Carefully crafted much of the work was done by the patients themselves. Further conflicts In 1916, few could have predicted the growing need for Erskine care in the 20th century and beyond. Sadly, conflicts such as the Falklands, the Gulf, Bosnia and Iraq continued to put pressure on our facilities. Erskine needed to change
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